Positive Reflections: From Combat to Community Group Exhibition

Positive Reflections: From Combat to Community Group Exhibition

Exhibition March 2, 2015-March 31, 2015

Opening Reception with Community Band and Poetry Reading March 13th 1-4:00pm

Group exhibition featuring Veterans from Yolo County.

Davis Cemetery District in partnership with Yolo Arts will host “Positive Reflections” a group art exhibition featuring art in all mediums from service members from all branches of the military. Positive Reflections explores the veteran experience and celebrates the transition of our service people from combat to civilian life. The exhibition will run from March 2-March 28, 2016 at the onsite cemetery gallery, Gallery 1855. A special reception will include a thrilling performance by the Yolo Community Band, posting of the colors and poetry reading. This art experience was funded by the Veterans Initiative in the Arts (VIA), a pilot grant program of the California Arts Council. A special thanks to Yolo County Veterans Services.

A Traveling Art Exhibit Inspired and 
Created by Veterans.

MARCH 13

Gallery 1855 (at Davis Cemetery) • 820 Pole Line Rd, Davis


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

AndyJones
1:00-1:30PM  Poetry Reading by Dr. Andy Jones, Poet Laureate of Davis and UC Davis faculty member.  Andy will read a poem he wrote specifically for this project entitled
“In the Almond Orchard”
wdld comm band
1:30-2:15PM Musical performance
by the Yolo Community Band
led by Artistic Director, Bobby Rogers
DavisGallery1855
1-4PM
Art Exhibit reception and refreshments
This event is FREE and open to the public.  Positive Reflections 
is funded by Veterans Initiative in the Arts (VIA), 
a pilot grant program of the California Arts Council
This art experience is brought to you by Yolo Arts

February Board Meeting Agenda

Davis Cemetery District Board Meeting

Agenda

 

Date:               02-17-2016                             

Time:              4:00 PM         

Location:  820 Pole Line Rd., Davis, CA

 

Call to order/introductions: Chairperson Stephen Souza, Vice Chairperson Larry Dean, Board members: Dennis Dingemans, Marilyn Mansfield, Bill Marshall

 

Approval of agenda

 

Public comment:

Opportunity for members of the public to address the Davis Cemetery District Board on issues related to Davis Cemetery District business but which do not appear on the agenda. The Davis Cemetery District Board reserves the right to impose a reasonable time limit afforded to any one topic or to any individual speaker.

 

Announcements:

 

Approval of minutes: December 23, 2015 and January 20, 2016

 

Consent calendar: None

 

Correspondence:  None

 

Superintendent’s Report

 

Community Outreach Update

 

Financial Statements: October & November 2015

 

Old Business:

 

  • Office Manager Staffing Plan
  • Bike Path

 

New Business:

 

  • Swinehart-Marker Height Fee Waiver Request

 

Adjournment and scheduling of next meeting: Chairperson

 

I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing agenda was posted on Friday, February 12, 2016 at the Davis Cemetery, 820 Pole Line Rd., Davis, CA 95618 by Ann McKay, Offi

Veterans

Veterans

The Davis Cemetery District welcomes veterans. Graveside services of any length with full military honors may be held onsite.

The Veterans Service Office has purchased a variety of cremation and casket plots on our grounds. These plots are made available for no cost on an “at need” basis to qualified veterans upon verification by the Veterans Service Office. Interment for the veteran’s spouse into the SAME plot is permitted.

Decedent family/friends are responsible for payment of opening/closing fees (Veteran and Spouse) and the purchase of a vault for casket burials.

Veteran markers are provided at no cost through the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs. Only flush military markers no larger than 12″ X 24″ are permitted on cremation plots. Upright military markers may be placed on casket plots.  A second flush 12″ X 24″ marker for spouse is permitted on casket plots only. All fees associated with second marker must be paid by family and/or friends. Veteran cremains shall be placed in the left half of the plot, spouse’s cremains in the right half, as marker is read.

Green Burial

Green Burial

WHAT IS A GREEN BURIAL? Green (or natural) burial emphasizes simplicity and environmental sustainability. The body is neither cremated nor prepared with chemicals such as embalming fluids. It is simply placed in a biodegradable container or shroud and interred without a concrete burial vault.

WHAT IS THE GREEN BURIAL PROCESS? The body or container is lowered into the earth without the use of a burial vault. Earth is then packed directly around and over the body or container. The Davis Cemetery District places a thin concrete vault lid on the packed dirt above the body and then puts more dirt on top of the lid in order in ensure the site remains flat and stable for the weight of the memorial marker and of our mowers and other equipment.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR THE GREEN BURIAL OPTION? The Davis Cemetery District offers the green burial option for either single or companion interment. In the case of a companion green burial, the District will use a separate vault lid on the packed dirt above each body.

Embalmed bodies and/or those in non-biodegradable caskets, such as metal, are not eligible for the green burial option. Green burial is not an option for the second interment into a companion plot in which a companion vault is already in place.

For a full list of services go here

 

February Exhibition Ben Tuason “Davis Shopscapes”

Ben Tuason introduces his latest works “Davis Shopscapes” at Gallery 1855 (820 Pole Line Road, Davis, CA) throughout the month of February. A special artist reception will be held Sunday, February 14, 2015 from 1-4:00pm. This exhibition is a collection of well-studied photographs of the evolving cityscape of downtown Davis, California. Ben Tuason has received great recognition for his work including Best of Show, First Place, Architecture Category, and First Place, Black and White category in the 2013 City of Davis Photography Contest.

Having lived in larger metropolises the majority of his life, Ben became drawn to the unpretentious, small-town feel of the Davis downtown. His ongoing photography study reflects the landscape of the evolving city. “It’s changing fast, in just the four or so years that I has lived here, many establishments have gone and new ones have taken their place” Ben commented. This series will serve as documents of a past era and the incredible growth of the dynamic city.

The artist will be selling a presentation of a folio of 8.5” x11” prints of the exhibited work. The fine-art Giclée prints are on acid-free, fiber-based exhibition quality paper, individually custom-printed and signed by the photographer.

BEN TUASON

While studying architecture, Ben Tuason was heavily influenced by the works of traditional masters of the black-and-white street genre. Coming to America in the mid-80’s, he gave up architecture to write pioneering software for the then-emerging personal computer. Through these careers, photography was always with him—sometimes as leisure pursuit, sometimes as therapy, very often as passion.

The exacting discipline of software programming, together with traditional film photography and processing, helped shape his deliberate and methodical compositional approach while his architectural background fostered a keen appreciation for the built environment and urban-centric photograph.

Varsity

Davis Cemetery District January Board Meeting Agenda

Davis Cemetery District Board Meeting

Agenda

Date:               01-20-2016                            

Time:             4:00 PM         

Location: 820 Pole Line Rd., Davis, CA

 

Call to order/introductions: Chairperson Stephen Souza, Vice Chairperson Larry Dean (Other Board members: Dennis Dingemans, Marilyn Mansfield, Bill Marshall)

 

Approval of agenda

 

Public comment:

Opportunity for members of the public to address the Davis Cemetery District Board on issues related to Davis Cemetery District business but which do not appear on the agenda. The Davis Cemetery District Board reserves the right to impose a reasonable time limit afforded to any one topic or to any individual speaker.

 

Announcements:

 

Approval of minutes: December 16, 2015

 

Consent calendar: None

 

Correspondence: None

 

Superintendent’s Report (verbal)

 

Community Outreach Update (verbal)

 

Old Business:

 

  • Office Manager Staffing Plan
  • Financial Statement Status

 

New Business: None

 

Adjournment and scheduling of next meeting: Chairperson

 

I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing agenda was posted on Friday, January 15, 2016 at the Davis Cemetery, 820 Pole Line Rd., Davis, CA 95618 by Ann McKay, Office Manager.

January Exhibition: Water Colors and Pastels of Teresa Steinbach-Garcia

Teresa Steinbach-Garcia

Exhibition Dates: January 2, 2015-January 30, 2015

Opening Reception: January 10, 2015 1-4:00pm

A native Californian and a Design graduate of The University of California at Davis, Teresa Steinbach-Garcia works in a painterly realistic style to record her world be it landscape, still life or portrait. Inspired by artists as varied as Andrew Wyeth, Michael Reardon and Kim Lordier she combines her background in watercolor with a new interest in pastels to capture the nuance of light and place, and interpret impressions of the man made and nature-made worlds.

Recent exhibits and awards include The Crocker Art Auction 2013 and 2014, the Crocker Kingsley 2015, California Art Club-Beauty of the Seasons at the Pence Gallery 2015 and “Where the Wild Things Are”, 2nd Place and inclusion in the Live Auction.

She regularly teaches watercolor both beginning and studio at the Elk Grove Fine Arts Center.
She is a member of the California Watercolor Association, Sacramento Fine Arts Center and W.A.S.H. as well as The Sacramento Chapter of the California Art Club, Pastel Society of the West Coast and American Women Artists.

  Two Windows

About Our Labyrinths

About Our Labyrinths

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A LABYRINTH AND A MAZE?
According to the Labyrinth Society of Edmonton, Canada,”A maze is designed to confuse you and challenge you to find your way to the exit or to the center and then back out again. It is designed to test your problem-solving skills, your memory, and your tolerance for frustration! A labyrinth is designed to give you a single path in and out (so there can be no confusion as to where to go). It is a confined, guided walk with many turns toward a center. It is designed to let you walk in a compact area while you let your mind relax and meditate.”

HISTORY: The oldest known examples of labyrinths go back approximately 3,000 years and are found from Ireland to Syria. Labyrinths have been constructed of almost every material imaginable over the years. Turf labyrinths in Europe are known to date back to at least the 1500’s.

While labyrinths have been used for everything from trapping evil spirits to simple games, there is a long history of their use as a form of spiritual contemplation, prayer, and penitence. Many famous cathedrals, from Chartres in northern France to Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, have pavement labyrinths for use by religious practitioners.

The center of our northern turf labyrinth(near the cemetery office)most closely resembles the design of the classical labyrinth rather than that of the medieval labyrinth. The entrance and the “long path” sections are a more creative free form style.

Our southern labyrinth, located near the southwestern parking area, was recently designed by Eagle Scout Adam Borchard based on the Cretan style. This labyrinth is most easily identified by the bench at its center.

USE: To use our labyrinths, we suggest walking the path slowly and contemplatively, with eyes somewhat downcast and slow, even breathing. For the north labyrinth near the office, begin at the railings that lead up the wheelchair ramp. As you approach the driveway, cross it and continue on the “long path” section. When the “long path” brings you back to the driveway, cross back and continue into the central labyrinth area. When you reach the center, pause briefly, turn, and wind your way back out again.

The entrance to our southern labyrinth is just southeast of the swale area, near our southern parking lot.

For maximum benefit, allow 10 – 15 minutes to walk either labyrinth. As you slowly walk the path, you might try pondering the path as a metaphor for life, praying, meditating, being very aware in the present moment, or paying particular attention to each breath.

We invite you to enjoy our labyrinths and, if you wish, to share about your experience with us. Let your friends and neighbors know about these special spots.

Ten things to do during your visit

Ten Things To Do During Your Visit…

*Inventory, photograph, paint or view our wildlife.

*Bring a sketchbook or a notebook and spend some quiet time on one of our benches. Let the beauty and the history inspire your creativity.

*Hike or jog the perimeter of the cemetery, enjoying the view from many perspectives. Climb our hill for a fresh look.

*Check out our historic swale, our perennial mounds, and our wildflower meadow (all located in the eastern half of the grounds).

*Check out our scent garden and our bulb and wildflower garden (both on the historic side of the cemetery). Enjoy our changing foliage. (Where else can you find a Nepal Camphor, native to the Himalayas, in Davis?)

*Soothe your soul listening to our Veteran Memorial Fountain.

*Take a meditative walk on one of our labyrinths.

*See the latest Gallery 1855 exhibit inside our iconic office building.

*Look at the lovely statues and historic stones. (Can you find the one that came all the way from China? Hint: it has wonderful dragons.)

*Discover Davis history through our self-guided history tour. A copy of our map can be found here.   (Can you find the headstone of the woman born in 1796?)

DID YOU KNOW?
We have six markers over 12 feet tall, four that range from 8-12 feet, and some thirteen between 6-8 feet high; they include eight obelisk markers and four full figure statues.
28% of all city council members are buried here, as are 24% of all persons for whom UC Davis buildings are named.